Friday, March 27, 2009

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108 comments:

  1. Lately, I have been working with Remote computing and instruction. The idea is that the student can access software and instruction remotely. I allow them to run the software on my machine with LogMeIn.com (a program like GoToMyPC.com) This set up has many advantages, the student can be remote and run software they don't own on a machine that is superior to theirs. We are talking live over Skype so I can see everything they are doing and if needed I can take the mouse and demonstrate things if needed. I have been testing it out on my own for the last Month and it actually is BETTER than being with them in person. Webvideo is not needed only a webcall!

    My bigger vision of this is that entire schools could be "remote". The students are remote, the software and hardware is "remote" and the instructors are "remote".

    Just last night I had a friend use Zbrush on my computer while I talked him through how to use it. This model will change education!

    All the best,

    Jason MacCoy
    University of Washington
    Game Animation

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  2. Sounds like an interesting model! Have you considered posting a demo of it on YouTube to share further?

    It certainly sounds like it would work for game animation, but what about other subject areas?

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  3. Jason,
    Are you concerned about security at all? At the IRM College we are experimenting with many different kinds of remote and mobile computing for both faculty and students. I like your method. I would like to hear more.,

    Brenda Roth
    Assistant Dean for Curriculum
    Information Resources Management College

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  4. Hi - Dwigtht Toavs here. I'm a professor at the IRM College and, with Paulette Robinson and Mike Piller, was fortunate to be in on the ground floor of establishing the Federal Consortium for Virtual Worlds (FCVW) - yup, an acronym junkie.

    Hope you could see the introductory video - done partly by Forterra using OLIVE and partly by our talented folks here in the College.

    Just saw Amy Webber of Amy Webber Studios, a major Second Life developer, walk into the auditorium.

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  5. Bob Childs is posing the challenge:
    How can we transform organizations?
    How can we cooperate for mutual advantage?
    How can we better collaborate across org boundaries?
    How can we engage all the interested parties to do the work of government - better, more effectively, more efficiently?

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  6. Christian Renaud is now being introduced by Paulette Robinson. He is a futurist, technologist, and an inspiring speaker. For many years he headed the virtual worlds activities at CISCO Systems.

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  7. Christian Renaud is talking about the people who are using virtual worlds. For the next 30 years or so, he said, there is going to be an interesting "melange" of people in the workplace. We have to continually refresh to keep up.

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  8. Hence the need for life long learning and development. That's going to take a lot of resources to sustain, so strategic planning is becoming crucial to the development of human capital.

    Just think of spending 20 years in higher ed. Virtual classrooms will become exponentially more important.

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  9. Shortfalls in the workforce will drive the nature of what the work place is going to look like. With more people available to work, it will be the workers who define the workplace rather than the other way around.

    Christian is focusing on the planet now and how working from home will save water and electricity. Oh, and it keeps us from sharing germs and creating a pandemic.

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  10. Christian is now validating that boomers should stay in the workforce longer because the skills they have can't be replace immediately. We'll have a mixture of boomers and young workers who are technologically savvy. What does the virtual workplace look like for this mixture?

    As a boomer, I am glad about the choice to stay longer. Why should people "retire" when they have so much to offer society? But it does look like I'll need to keep up with technology and learn Spanish and Mandarin.

    Tom is blogging next to me and is looking up how to learn Mandarin Chinese via the internet.

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  11. Anyone want something to do with your kids? Learn Mandarin...they'll need it.

    Actually, find a game to learn it. I googled "game, learning chinese" and this came up:

    http://www.digitaldialects.com/Chinese.htm

    Look around. Education needs to tap into the child's interest in technology if they are going to keep up.

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  12. Christian Renaud notes:

    1 - People. Demographics will play a large role in virtual world usage and uptake. Mobile workforce will become norm. 56% of 2020 population will be from Asia - great impact on composition of global workforce. Challenges of access to water; incidence of disease; age of workforce; skills shortfalls; factors such as this will affect where people work and how they work.
    In US, when social security age was set at 65 the average life expectancy was 61!

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  13. Christian Renaud notes:

    2 - Planet - Water: 1% of the earth's water is available for human use (Canada has about 25%of that). Conservation is ever more important. Longest recorded period between pandemics is 39 years.
    Energy: 70-80% of energy generated is wasted through distribution, lack of storage capacity, societal wastful use; commuting; non-value added trips, etc.

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  14. Christian Renaud notes:

    Society - Workforce demographics are changeing significantly. The new employee you hire fresh out of college in 2020 was born in 1997. 30% of children 6 and under have a TV in their bedroom. Access to education is critical. Mandarin Chinese usage on Internet grew over 800% since 2000. We are becoming more transparent about work - think about how many folks on Facebook, or Twitter, or blogs. Work now involves more collaboration than individual work - addresses more complex problems.

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  15. The world's economy is growing and the per capita income will be 50% higher in 2020, Renaud says. This ties into Friedman's book, Hot, flat, and crowded, where the gap between the haves (the U.S. for exmaple) and the have nots (Africa for example) is narrowing. This will put a huge strain on the world's infrastructure and resources.

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  16. The Karma that Christian is talking about now will cost $80,000. Here is what an ad says about it:

    The Fisker Karma will be propelled by a Q-Drive system which offers an autonomy of 80 miles in full electric mode. The existing conventional engine can also be used to load the lithium-ion batteries if they run out - in this situation the consumption can climb up to a value of 2.4 liters per 100 kilometers

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  17. Christian Renaud notes:

    4 - Technology: What are our assumptions about technology and the infrastructures we need to support our assumptions about technologies we use? Do you still experience dropped cell calls? Why? What are the implications for work and the workforce? Fisker Carma spawns technolust - a gorgeous, non-polluting electric dream car!
    Language technology market is $10 bn annually. Need to think about creating a bi- or tri-lingual culture for our kids!

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  18. Not only could we cut the car, we could cut the cords. Developments in wireless energy transfer could make the world even more mobile.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer#History_of_wireless_energy_transfer

    Of course, it's Wikipedia.

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  19. Christian Renaud notes:

    4 - Technology (con't): What technologies will keep aging workere in the workforce (need their skills, their accumulated knowledge, their mentoring / onboarding for new workers)? How about robotic telepresence bots so the Boomer oil expert (age 61) can explore a drilling site in Khazakstan without dealing with the grueling travel?

    BTW, Christian Renaud is talking and referring to notes stored on his iPhone.

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  20. Christian Renaud (summary comments):
    Future poses completely different workforce; different languages; different skills; different workspaces. These can help lower energy and water footprints, make better use of all resources, and become stewards of all natural and societal resources rather than exploiters as is the case today.

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  21. Renaud is wrapping up:
    in the next ten years we will have a blended work force. We will have to lower our energy and resource footprint. Looks like teleworking and using all the virtual tools we have at our disposal will identify the workplace. At the IRM College, we are allowed to telework and we use many collaborative tools inside and outside the classroom. It makes for a rich work environment. I would love to hear how others are using virtual world tools and techniques to work, teach, or play.

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  22. Setting up for Education Panel: Imagining a Future Learning Ecosystem
    Tony O'Driscoll (Duke)
    Randy Hinrichs (2b3D)
    Larry Clemons (USAF)

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  23. Educator Perspective -- Tony O'Driscoll
    Motivation is sucked out of education. What makes education motivating for you? I care about the experiences.

    Paulette Robinson

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  24. People do not want to search and not want to find. Webevolution from to--to (web 1.0) through (web 2)--to within (3Di). Access-->Find-->Share-->Participate-->Collborate-->CoCreate. Social producation of information -- dedicate discretionary time. What do you use your discretionary time? Do you use any of it in virtual worlds?

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  25. Blue Maindrake? Word cloud above your head. Jay Cross--learning as corraling colleagues toward an effort. Learning equals Nert-WORKing. Learning are a life long spectrum then becomes more inclusive and beyond events. New value change information is new currency John Seeley Brown. People is transport insight is outcome Conversation is the transfer. "Immernet" welcome to the IMMErnet--from the movie trailer for Tron.

    Routinization. Guttenburg-->Watt-->Lumiere How the technology is reinvented. "paved cowpaths vesus creating freeways with exits.

    Differentiation (see You Tube)

    History Lesson--back then it must have really sucked? Point of older view of education is still in place. Does it still suck and how can we change it?

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  26. Tony O'Driscoll:
    Motivation - typically sucked out of the classroom before "education" is expected to begin (see Ferris Buehler's Day Off).
    Webvolution: Web 1.0 > Web 2.0 > 3Di
    Value Prop: "Connect To" Access/Find (Web 1.0); "Connect Through" Share/Participate/Collaborate (Web 2.0); "Connect Within" Co-Create (3Di).
    Getting things done requires good connections, both the human kind and the Internet kind. Schooling has confused us into thinking that learning was equivalent to pouring content into people's heads. It's more practical to think of learning as optimizng our networks.
    Information=Currency; People=Transport;oops missed the rest-this is tuf.
    Routinization: We alway automate before we improve.

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  27. The evolution of Learning --Randy Hinrichs
    Learning how to "be" 3d in a virtual environment. Look at the kids and what they are doing. Everything is being done at rapid speed. 5 principles--1) it is about all of us and not about me. Large brain rather than an individual brain. Neuroplasticity--how transforming the brain works. Evolution of inherited traits. Telling, doing, sharing and clanning. Learning genetic material across generations--accumulative, generational, and small changes.

    2 opposing forces....common variants and constant variation. Interoperability of people. U of WA class -- "hive" learning all moved from one SL to another Protosphere. Do you have hives you learn with? How do you move through technologies to do hive learning?

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  28. Transfer of Genes: IP Managemrnt. Managing IP through the value chain. Move digital objects with IP attached. Evolutionary Mutations--anyone can create. Massing together for short periods of time. Reproducing with teh fittest--'no napkins anymore" Share experiences where this is true for you.

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  29. Randy Hinrichs (2b3D CEO) (U of Washington):
    Aaah - got caught up in listening and my fingers stopped. Fascinating stuff.

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  30. Larry Clemons (USAF): Nice video of Gen Lorenz, head of Air Education and Training Command (USAF/AETC), in VR world - using RW videos to illustrate points. Good looking avatar, General! Bet you're one of very few, if not the only, 4-star avatar. Way to go!

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  31. Larry Clemons--USAF The Future of AF Education and Training. myBase project. See the white paper at http://www.ndu.edu/irmc/fedconsortium.html on April 2008 program. Future Learning Division new funding and new staff. Proof of concepts studies. Opportunities to collaborate with vendors and academics. Projects "myBase Public" MyBase Training. AF.edu, ADL Course Conversion and "Instruction for the Future" in Planning: Mobiles LEarning, My BAse Medical Campus, FM Learning TRansformation , Little DMO and Air Force Game. Public space is for Public and Recruiting. Training--behind the firewall. Broad support with the use of virtual worlds almost as a portal. COnvergence of training, DL, CoP, disctibuted mission, etc. Lifelong learning spectrum--travels through the work life in AF and beyond for mentoring. How do you think that meets training needs? Can you see this for your organization? How?

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  32. Larry Clemons (USAF): Showing "U.S. DoD Second Life Continent" in Second life with islands by US Air Force, US Navy and US Army grouped together as a continent. Very cool!

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  33. Cool capabilities displayed, however, a questioner wonders when "real" Air Force members and civilians will be able to access these capabilities from the desktop?
    Great question - key challenge is the paradox of the present: restrictive information assurance policies which collide with open and collaborative potential. Only a few isolated places where folks can presently plug into these emerging capabilities.

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  34. Knowledge Management Analytical Spaces
    Time machine and the "n" dimensions and difference time. Like a VCR and contextually defined and "here and now" that is a reference point which can be used to compare "if when" games that can use different times in reference to the here and now. How would you see how the narrative can be viewed in past and present contexts?

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  35. Mind snaps--mental book marks to explore your own analytical process. Collection of decision nodes--for story structure, pop-up summary, themes, history. How would you create a mental book mark system and what would be the important elements of this?

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  36. How to work with legacy worlds or acceptable worlds now. Novamente--spatiaotemporal query knowledge.

    Working Through SYnthetic World--December 2009. 21 chapters--Forecasting, Forensic Analysis, Cognitive Amplifiers, Training, Infrastructure. Day in the life narrative projection, middle part--tech roadmap, research that can be done.

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  37. Mike Macedonia (Forterra)--Knowledge Management in the Age of Zillionics

    NCIS--Lockheed Martin show in NCIS Tuesday 28th. Olive virtual world to solve a crime in Long Beach.

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  38. Shameless plug: Watch NCIS this next Thursday to see OLIVE in action. April 28. In this episode the NCIS team will use Forterra's OLIVE virtual worlds platform, with special thanks to Lockheed Martin and their connections, to solve a crime in Long Beach.

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  39. OOPS - NCIS is on Tuesday April 28!!!

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  40. Kevin Kelly --zillionics--ubuquitous always-on sensors in bodies and environment unrelenting reivers of sensory data will flow day and night from zillions of sources.

    Truly disruptive. Convergence of several things because of the information--you HAVE to make decisions. Ubiquity of the network is also influencing this process. Fundamental thing is that the expectations of people are changing.

    Intel--ones under 25 and the "Other" ones. 25 are the majority and "where are the tools?"

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  41. Imagine what data means and live in a virtual world. Look at scopes with data and they see in their mind a ship. What virtual world to you imagine in your workplace as you make sense of the data?

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  42. No one is collaborating with all of the imagined visions from data. What we really need to do is connect the real world to the virtual worlds. We all live in real places. Need to be able to model the real world in the virtual world. In the past--incredibly expensive. Google earth led us in this direction. Need to be able to collaborate and connect with sensors that we have around us all of the time. Do all of this and then construct a workspace. Green Phosporus to abstract information in the virtual world. Also need to be bring in our contemporary productivity tools. Then we need to put it into a context to put a context into the discussion. It bounds the problem--what it is that we are here for. Do you think we need this context to do work or do you think that we create spaces different than our work context to change organizational processes and restraints?

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  43. Processing information through community. What elements do you think needs to be included in virtual worlds or integrated with virtual worlds to enrich the community?

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  44. Execute decisions in virtual world spaces. We are moving to command and control. Need to connect to existing systems. These worlds are brain amplifiers. These are real places to make decisions. Virtual worlds offer a place to make sense of it all. COllaboration and context are keys. Put the data and the people in a virtual world.

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  45. Virtual WOrlds; The Next Generation of Military COmmunities of Practice. All about knowledge transfer is what knowledge management is all about. It is about a process. People from diverse backgrounds, connect and build a level of trust to transfer knowledge. What do you think is essential for a community of practice to form? What tools are needed to encourage and foster a community of process?

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  46. If we can assume that a virtual world can be the future of community of practice, what type of design changes need to be made from 2-D to 3D? What information are essential to retain in 2D? Does presence enable knowledge sharing?

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  47. Immersive experience with CoP is not available currently that is blended between synchronous and asynchronous experiences. How would you build a hybrid that takes advantage of these?

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  48. Some of the demos here are great! Love the giant hamster ball that you can go in and experience virtual movement. The real-life projects are interesting, and the speakers know their stuff! Great event!

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  49. Strange -- I've been watching the program online in SL, and (apparently) am the *ONLY* person here. Almost as bad, there have been no Twitter postings about it (so far).

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  50. lsass.exe crashed my laptop and my son's on Vista with old video card, so no SL for me today. Quicktime's link is supposedly removed and Windows Media first lost is audio adn now everything. I can't get to any stream. Plus, no one seems to be watching the Twittersphere. No answers there either. I sincerley hope that the archives will be audio AND video including the Q&A sessions.

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  51. one hour ago comment: the presentor who mentioned that SL does not allow for asynchronous communication does not seem to be aware of applications and tools in SL that DO facilitate asynchronous communication and team work. Also, he complains that SL limits the space to 40 avatars. Of course military has usually more than 40 people who need to meet up at one time, but this presenter needs to be aware that conferences have been organized in SL with locations allowing several hundreds of av in one place. The NMC administrators of SL land have gotten that down to pat.

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  52. State & local government in virtual worlds. Government is often in stovepipes. The virtual worlds are tougher at the state and local government. FCVW is sharing with the state and local government. They have tremendous initiatives that can be shared with us. Paul Wright with CIO's office from State of MO will share with us in Second Life.

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  53. Stae of MO using virtual worlds for recruiting IT staff. Do you think Second Life is a good place to recruit for staff? Have you done this in your agency?

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  54. Createed an outreach consortium with various strategies. Trying to get students interested in going into IT field particularly in state and local governments. NACIO is one of the state organizations that they are working with. How have you used consortiums to advance an idea for the use of virtual worlds to meet a business need?

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  55. Linking to other state organizations and local communities in SL. Helps to connect the virtual worlds to common technologies as part of the overall approach. They have Facebook which gives them another connection. How many of you have a social media plan where you use a variety of tools toward approaching a business solution?

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  56. State of MO Issues
    1) Security
    2) Bandwith
    3) Who should have access
    4) how is it paid for?

    How are these issues the same for you?

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  57. Sunshine laws and requirement to record conversations. Do these apply to meetings in SL and if so which ones? Does anyone have experience with these?

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  58. Not much being done by other states--KS State library, State of IA. Over the next year we will see more.

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  59. We're experiencing a bout of griefing in SL during the presentation by Paul and Jan. This is the first one I've seen/experienced so it is both interesting (and sometimes funny) as well as disruptive (intended effect).

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  60. Munigov is a local and state government. https://sites.google.com/site/munigov20/. Check it out--a federal, state and local government. Membership is free and easy to join. Wednesday evening meetings at 7 pm EST.

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  61. Artificial intelligence panel--place for AI in 3d spaces where it is being used.

    Dr. Ben Goertzal - CEO Novamente
    Dr, Nichael Van Lent SOARTECH
    Dr. Todd Griffith CEO Discovery Machine

    Training simulations much richer with AGI. Computational complexity. Scaling complexity so that AGI can be used by more general population using AGI. Interfaces need to be simplier for authoring.

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  62. How might we use intelligent agents (or bots) in virtual worlds? What attributes should such bots/IAs possess to be more than just eye candy? What kinds of functions would it be useful for bots/AIs to perform for us in virtual worlds?

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  63. On Twitter, jsfailla noted that AI in virtual worlds will eventually be used to simulate reaction of local populations to military activities (#FCVW09). I find this notion particularly interesting, and might suggest that military operations in the future could/should do that to better understand and plan for a variety of reactions to those military opns. Is this the future of wargaming?

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  64. Social now in Marshall Hall atrium. Come on and continue the conversation!
    Cheers
    Dwight

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  65. Where is everyone in Second Life? I was looking for a group for good back-channel all day yesterday (23d) and only found a few folks in one of the most uncomfortable sims (inside a "building" looking at tiny PPT screen) when all other venues were beautiful, with huge screens and abandoned.

    I'll be on the hunt again today and hope to find more folks in the wide-open spaces venues

    Virtual NUWC - Harbourside Amphitheater
    http://slurl.com/secondlife/USS%20San%20Juan/148/103/22

    US MilLands Amphitheater
    http://slurl.com/secondlife/Coalition%20Island/173/188/25

    who want to chat about the presentations.

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  66. Reflections. The government seems more serious about the virtual world than ever before. The poster sessions provided the juice. Hackathorn st al suggests a Goverati is forming. They embrace strategic collaborative mind mapping tools to brainstorm and visually ideas for consensus and action. They embrace transparency of datasets for GIS mashups and extending science on a sphere. Is a Renaissance awakening for science and engineering education for our schools. Go to school in data not classrooms with few computers.

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  67. Linden Labs seems more serious too about supporting government at the enterprise level. They are focusing on stability, scalability, and security. A behind the firewall beta is scheduled for May, already tested in many enterprise shops. I can't wait to see those case studies. Their capability maturity is advancing with dedicated gov support. Keep it up. The poster sessions abound in SL experimentation like Psychological Health Island examining ways to use virtual worlds to deal with PTSD for our service members with the Defense Center of Excellence T2 support. Virtual NUWC hosts their underwater warfare center. The forces are reaching out with recruiting and TRADOC has a 4 phase learning strategy plan planned for their Warrior University. Now how and when does all this SL Momentum get supported ok .mil? Or is a private public partership and strategy hanging in the air?

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  68. Governance, Policy Acquisition Keynote
    The Cloud, the Crowd, & the 3-D Internet - What's Next for Collaboration Online
    Michael Nelson, PhD Visiting Professor, Georgetown University providing his background. BS in Geology, Caltech, Geophysics PHD MIT, 4 years as Senator Gore's Science Advisor. IT policy gur at the White House. Now at Georgetown and part of Obama's campaign's tech team.

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  69. Where is computing going? State your conclusions upfront. 3rd phase of the Internet and we on our way, 2-3 years to get it right though. Standards, business practices are the things we need to focus on. We've got to get it right. Did I say that already?

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  70. So, let's look at the trends. #1 Cloud Computing. The academic grids are the prototypes. Amazon, Google and Microsoft are building huge data centers and offering online apps. Amazon's is called the Elastic Compute Cloud. And, of course gmail is the "entry drug of choice for cloud users". Remember Dennis Miller's comment, virtual reality is going to make crack look like sanka? Now the new drug is the graphic and the video (Flickr and YouTube). On-line back-ups are the most anticipated app.

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  71. Dr. Nelson has some good advice for helping create buzz around ideas:

    - Have a good pitch(or bumper sticker)
    - Have memorable factoids
    - Present your conclusion upfront

    Good advice for making your ideas "sticky." Knowing how to make ideas viral is essential for getting innovative ideas to the ears of those with influence.

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  72. Akamai visualizes the Internet. 2,783,746 HTTP Hits per second. This is proof that the cloud has arrived. And of course the main stream media is all cloud happy: The WSJ, March 26, 2009 waxes eloquently. The first phase is communicating, the second phase is content, and now guess what, collaboration is the 3rd phase. Our hopes (my comment) the interface is the virtual world. And, read the Big Switch by Nick Carr, rewiring the world, from Edison to Google.

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  73. Gartner says the cloud will be as big as e-business. That isn't surprising actually, and it's easy to say, the cloud and e-business are the same promise. Business services over the Internet. But, the big deal is the 100 billion devices that are creating an organic internet. It's almost a biological unit interconnected, providing access to not only anyone, but anything. Even our dogs are going to be connected to the Internet. And, now everyone will know you are a dog on the Internet (that's evolution).

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  74. Oh yes, and the real reason for today's excitement about that cloud is that it got Obama elected. Read "how obama really dit it". Sept-Octo 2008 issue of MIT's Technology Review. So guess who's coming to dinner in the White House - well the Internet to create transparency and enable you, the digital worker of the 21st century. Are there jobs?

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  75. U.S. IP Traffic Projection brigs you the new term exabytes per month. And by 2015 nearly 100 exabytes of information will move across the internet, estimates Swanson and Gilder, 2008. Let's break that down, 100 EB movie downloads and P2P, video calling and virtual windows 400 EB, Remote back up 50EX and there's more, but we'll need the slides. So want to hear a hairy audacious prediction, in 10 years there will be 100 billion devices and sensors connected to the net. But, wait, it's starting to get thick, there are standards preventing us from the frictionless Internet. IpV6, DNSsec, IPsec, Grid standards. And of course there is no consense on business practices or cooperation on opern stands ver proprietary lock -in solutions. And, then the most unsettling issue, "trust the cloud" gut wrenching reactions. So, now we must hit the policy chambers. So, my question is do virtual worlds and their collaborative interactivity provide the forum spaces for debating these polices to escalate solutions. This conference could marshall that action plan!

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  76. So, three possible scenarios. Different, distinct, proprietary clouds, non interoperable and emulating the cable television networks, with bottlenecks and monopolies. Hmm. Not!

    2. Distinct clouds, interconnected, with interoperable applications, litle middleware.

    3. Pant, pant, then a "cloud of cloud" like the network of networks. Truly interoperable, mix and match, common middleware, seamless, almost infinite. And we need government leadership to get there.

    So, the sky's the limit and the aim, and if we can rally a new president into office, could we rally a new internet into office.

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  77. VW will benefit, far cheatper computing resources leading to more realist worlds, more sophisticated physics engines and easier to use toolo. Sensors and camera like Second Earth. Virtual wworld driving the exabyte flood. The virtual worlds could help bring the different pieces of the cloud together aiming us at the "blue skies" scenario. Hope is hanging in the air here. And virtual worlds will be the vanguard of the effort to address new cloud policy challenges.

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  78. Sorry about the spelling, but this is going fast. So, now for something sober. Open standards. Will virtual worlds interconnect, allowing content and avatars to move from one world to another. How much interoperability is needed, desirable in these worlds?? And do governments have a role to play in fostering open standards.

    And what about intellectual property in the virtual world. What is fair use in the virtual world. Lawyers arise! There's new ground here for patents. And which IPR laws apply. Governments arise! There's opportunities for policy collaboration.

    And what about wiretapping and electronic surveillance. Under what conditions can a law enfordement agency gain access to a Second Life user's data? Linden Labs? Got thoughts? Again, let's rally a cybersecurity event on virtual worlds to address these questions head on!

    And what about consumer protection. Are the terms of the user's contract enough or is government regulation needed?

    And what about contract issues and rules of incorporation. How do you incorporate a company whose employees and board never meet? How do you deal with a virtual, ever-changing work force? And how do you manage enforcement? Shameless opportunity to identify 2b3d as an earlier adopter. We are only virtual, our offices are in Second Life on 2b3d island. And this is the only way to address these issues, by being 3d and handling each issue as it arises. Sorry, privledge of the Blog.

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  79. Taxation in virtual worlds. Very interesting. As far as interoperability, will there ever be a common virtual currency so that policies can be applied consistently without having to convert to another currency?

    What about anonimity and verifying real identities in virtual worlds?

    The convergence of the real and the virtual will be, in my opinion, one of the most compelling issues in terms of virtual world policy.

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  80. Quoted Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger and John Crowley, 2006. Well thought out piece.

    1. Virtual world provideres will serve as regulators by enforcing the terms of their contracts with users to prevent cyber-fraud and ensure proper behavior.

    2. Governments could try to block their citizens from using virtual worlds that don't abide by government restrictions and regulations (although this will never be 100% effective, just as governments have not been able to completely block access to Web sites).

    Government may try to minimize the real-world impact of virtual worlds by, for instance, banning the sale of virtual goods for real-world currency.

    WIldest scenario. Real-world assisted virtual world self-governance.

    Now who doesn't like the wildest scenario. Second Life has had protests in-world, and had to handle it as a self correcting cloud force. FaceBook also has had to handle similar occurences.

    Speaker believes the solution is a hybrid between 1 and 2.

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  81. Conclusions: new virtual worlds will spawn new policy challenges. The 3-D internet, just like the web will fundamentally challenge business models and regulatory models. So there is a need for lots of lawyers and policy makers who understand virtual worlds. There's a serious lack of good data on what's happening in virtual world, so we need studies, inventories, and exemplars. And virtual worlds like SL will provide instructive test cases for addressing poloicy problems in the cloud, the evolving distributed IT infrastructure.
    Now for the questions.

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  82. Rebooting America. Free on-line, 35 different essays. Required reading if you want to see what different people think about how social media can change government. Several people who contributed essays are working in the white house and influencing the direction of thinking.

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  83. How do you deal with the security to get this stuff behind the firewall. Mr. Cohen is looking for innovation to get enterprise to work with government, so there is harmony between the .mil and .com worlds.

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  84. Just read the last 80 posts (all good thoughts). Please the efforts of the Web3D Consortium (Extensible 3D (X3D), H-Anim, X3D Earth) and my idea of Lifegraphs when the conversation goes technical and international (ISO) standards and avatar interoperability (anmination scripts) comes up. Please visit my blog on X3D for Enterprise Applications (goto slidshare and search with that title).

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  85. It's time to seriously consider a rewrite a law that prevents government agencies from communicating with each other, and citizens from properly understanding what's being done in their name. Let the sun shine in. Let openness be the default, and the application of security require assertion. Anyone thinking that this outdated compartmentalization of information contributes to the public safety is severely deluded.

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  86. I suggest enumerating the laws to be changed (I don't know them). Then illustrate the data model for the citizen next to the services for the citizen...population besides the organizational breakdown structure that will provide those services under a new legal/regulatory regime. I think the penal codes for misuse of citizen data aggregated in a truly integrated government (local to national) need to reflect the severity of that misuse. And the statutes of limitation on those crimes have to be tied to the life of the victim or his/her legal estate (which ever is longer and can prove loss or harm from the misuse).

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  87. How can the government walk the fine line of working with the providers for compatibility and avoiding regulating? I'd love an answer to that.

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  88. Dr. Young in the house. Virtual Worlds and Web 2.0 sites are a great place for socializing, fantasizing, collaboration and learning but are you a target in these 3D environments? So, Dr. Young is all about looking at 3D environments and the threats and vulnerabilites you feach each time you login. What kinds of information are you releasing about yourself? Do you really know who you are interacting with in virtual world. Could someone take your personal information and cause you harm? Or cause the Government harm? What do you stand to loose. What do we stand to loose? Are you ready to be exposed?

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  89. Terrorists, criminals, hackers all want you to share. You like social networking, the hacker likes your privacy. Dr. Rocky Young, Faculty, IRM College and Capt. Stephen Mancini, USAF Faculty, IRM has got some advise for you. So let's examine 3D environments, VWs, WoW, SL, Facebooking, Twittering, Blogging, Social Networking, Information Sharing and Web 2.0/3.0. Hackers will examine them with you too. And, they'll spend more time learning what to do to you there than you'll learn to do for yourself.

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  90. The best way for the hacker to get into your machine is physically. Where do you work?

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  91. Or better yet, where do you live, because we can use our universal cloners to get in. We have postal outfits, UPS outfits, plumber outfits, we can easily use one of these universal cloners to get what we want. Keep your doors locked, says Rocky. Stay alert and you won't get hurt.

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  92. All computers may be a collapsing house of walls, if for one minute you think you're secure, or it doesn't mean anything if you don't have a firewall or not. Or that you don't have anything to steal. You're like candy to the hacker. Keeping thinking that way. Sweet!

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  93. I can disable your LED light and access your camera, did you know that. Unplug it! Because your reputation can be taken away faster than candy from a baby. So, let's bring this down to virtual worlds? What are the mission/business benefits of moving into VWs? your thinking increasing membership, outreach, enhanced communication with members, perceived technological advancement, increased brand recognition? So, have you weighed those against the security risks and resources required to secure your presence? Have you considered the human resources you need to successfully implement and maintain your VW. Are you ready for this commitment? I could destory your DNS and reroute your computer to rocky.com if you're not paying attention.

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  94. I think about loading my Malware into your batteries because although your sticker says DELL or HP or LENOVO, do you know where the batteries come from. The component you buy and stick in to upgrade your machine? Some risks you must consider.

    Risk:
    1. End point vulnerability. Public VWs install applications to the desktop. While there is currently no indication that these applications represent higher risk, the can be difficult to control and could be easily exploited - have you evaluated the code? Really? You haven't, so how do you trust it?

    Solutions: A thumb print, well, I can likely find that on-line somewhere.

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  95. Risk:
    2. Identiy and access control. It is currently very difficult to insure that an avatar is who they say they are. One of the most significant deficiencies in public VW & Priv.

    3. Brand and reputation. VWs are fraught with challenges which could.

    4. SLURLs placed with the virtual world that can re-direct the user to dangerous or illegitamte web sites, poisoning DNS or DNSSEC ...

    USB Drives. Hmm, DoD blocked them, but they're not blocked at home.

    Social Engineering

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  96. Do not forget the legal issues: Do you know what to do for a data leak. When are they detected? What state is the individual from?? MI is different from CA/ What was lost? PII or NIP (nonpbulic information)? What is the breach notification law for the exposed data. Was there HIPAA, privacy? or FOUO info?

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  97. Consolidate your network servers. Hackers like that.

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  98. Minimum reasonable security measure by law - which state? What about the eu?

    use of encryption with data at rest and in transit-within and outside the org LAPTOPS, Limit access to wireless networks. Lock them Down. Use of strong passwords/multiple passwords for administrator to acess systems - never logging as admin unless nec. Limit access of internal systems to the internet - unclas/secret/top secret? Employ measures to detect and prevent unauthorized access - IDS vs IPS. COnduct security investigation have you tested your coop lately? Patching and updating of anti-virus - use more than one. Requiring periodic changes to passwords what is your policy. Locking accounts after tooo many failed attempts at logging in. Great DOS! Storing credentials in insecure formats (i.e. cookies in the clear. A No, No. Use of secure transit for credentials. (i.e., https/ssh) maybe sslsplit - hacker. Forbidding sharing of accounts no no but happens @ medical units. Regular assessment of networks and applications for security vulnerabilities, etc.

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  99. The four most common mistakes made when developing a web app. Not understanding the technology. Not understanding the business/mission. Underestimating the threats. And underestimating the evil user, "LOL".

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  100. SKATA and INSIDER THREAT, scare Rocky the most.

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  101. Russians have been outsourced to hack.

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  102. Child pornography is a huge threat to security it holds lots and lots of malware. Downloaded music is heavily damaging.

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  103. Install file sharing software carefully. What/where is being shared? Use a security program from a vendor you you know and trust to avoid that one.

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  104. If you have a Facebook site, use a gmail google account. Never post your security number. Don't post photos on your website. They can be used? Keep your private information private. Simply use your common sense and use your instincts.

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  105. Careful when you put your picture on the internet. It has a lot of metadata in it. So 7 practices for computer security.
    1. Protect your personal information it's valuable.
    2. Know who you're dealing with - on and offline.
    3. Use security software that updates automatically.
    4. Keep your operating systems and web browser up to date, and learn about their security features.
    5. Keep your passwords safe, secure, and strong.
    6. Back up important fiels, off line.
    7. Learn what to do in an emergency - your own little COOP.

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  106. Kid's Privacy.
    Your kids perosnal info and privacy are valuable, to you, to them, and to marketers. Check out sites with your kids and visit them together and see what kind of information the sites ask for or allow kids to post.

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  107. Do you think you're getting security yet? How would you use Virtual Worlds in a secure way. Everyone is validated, then close adherence to guidance, then intrusion detection. VPN secure from end to end, not primary work system. We should all have internet cafes that are not monitored. Don't check social networks on your primary system. I can't validate you're you. There is no way to trail what I've done. The client software hasn't been evaluated. Forterra has been evaluated, so it's more trustable. Virtual world and typing opens a channel and I can push and pull there, especially in a sandbox.

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  108. Closing remarks. Rocky is a brilliant speaker, a concerned professional and a funny guy. Paulette Robinson is a goddess and needs to be thanked by every individual, every vendor, every poster dsiplayed, and every individual who is changed now because of their experience here at the federal consortium for virtual worlds. The National Defense University deserves a significant honor for hosting such a great conference and bringing "juice" into the virtual worlds. See you next year.

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